Tag Archives: Prevention

Unikkaartuit: Meanings and Experiences of Suicide Among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada

Kral, M. J., Idlout, L., Minore, J. B., Dyck, R. J., & Kirmayer, L. J. (2014). Unikkaartuit: Meanings and Experiences of Suicide Among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada. International Journal of Indigenous Health, 10(1), 55-67.

Inuit in Arctic Canada have one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Most of these suicides occur among youth, especially males, between the ages of 15 and 24. The goal of this study was to gain an understanding of Inuit experiences with suicide and what suicide means to Inuit, including suicide attempters and bereaved survivors. Fifty Inuit between the ages of 14 and 94 were interviewed about suicides in two communities in Nunavut. Sixty-three high school and college students were also surveyed with the same questions. It was found that suicide was most closely related to romantic relationship and family problems, and to experiences of loneliness and anger. These findings are interpreted in the context of massive social change, on-going colonization, and multigenerational trauma following the colonial government era of the 1950s and 1960s, when family and interpersonal relationships were significantly affected. The study stresses that suicide prevention strategies focus on youth and family, particularly on parenting, and ensure that Inuit communities take control of prevention programs. It recommends that family and community resources be further mobilized for suicide prevention.

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Cultural, social, and medical equity could provide lasting solutions to Sri Lanka’s suicide epidemic

Following a decade of decline, Sri Lanka’s suicide rate – once amongst the highest in the world – is reported to be on the rise once again. It’s too early to tell whether this is a temporary blip or the beginnings of something more serious. But what is known is that the fall in the suicide rate was the result of ‘means restriction’ – chiefly sales restrictions placed on the most toxic pesticides – and not the result of falling levels of suicide attempts per se. In fact, the evidence suggests that the number of suicide attempts has actually increased in the same period, with suicidal behaviour remaining a leading cause of serious injury and death in youth and older persons in Sri Lanka. Continue reading

Suicide in Sri Lanka: Understanding the Crisis

Suicide and deliberate self-harm represent significant health and social crises in Sri Lanka, placing extraordinary burdens on individuals, families, communities, and public services. By the final decade of the 20th century, the Sri Lankan suicide rate was one of the highest in the world; since then the rate has dropped, but rates of deliberate self-harm have significantly increased. The cause of the fall in the suicide rate was mainly the result of means restrictions – banning the most toxic pesticides used in self-harm – and improved health services implemented from the late 1990s, as well as an apparently spontaneous shift to medicinal drugs as a popular method of self-harm, which have a lower fatality rate. This briefing note aims to provide an overview of suicide and self-harm in Sri Lanka in relation to rates, demographic and social patterns, causes, and interventions.

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Event

Preventing Māori suicide focus of upcoming webinars

15 January 2013

For many, New Zealand’s high suicide rates – especially for Māori – can seem overwhelming. Suicide among Māori is a complex issue, and most people don’t know how they can help.

For those who want to learn about Māori suicide prevention, a free series of live and interactive webinars will be broadcast in 2013.

The Mental Health Foundation (MHF) is hosting the three webinars in collaboration with the Office of the Pro Vice Chancellor Māori, Victoria University of Wellington.

The webinars will address the issue of Māori suicide from an indigenous perspective. Presenters are respected Māori who will speak from their own personal and professional experiences in Māori suicide prevention.

“We hope that these webinars will increase understanding of what can be done to prevent suicide, and increase viewers’ capacity to help vulnerable people in their own whānau and communities,” says MHF Chief Executive Judi Clements.

The webinars will appeal to anyone interested in Māori suicide prevention, including kaimahi/professionals from a range of sectors who work with Māori whānau, hapū, iwi, hāpori Māori and individuals.

“Whānau is pivotal… it is the key to suicide prevention,” says Dr Nicole Coupe, who will be co-presenting the third webinar in March with Dr Lynne Russell.

“For Māori, culture is the centre-point of being connected… whānau will bring them back to their language, their whakapapa, their whenua, their marae. Connecting Māori with whānau is how we can bring them back to life.”

The webinar series will be an “an important platform and vehicle for examining how we respond to Māori suicide as whānau, hapū, and iwi,” says Keri Lawson-Te Aho, presenter of the first webinar.

The webinar schedule is:

  • Preventing Māori suicide: What do we need to do? 29 January 2013 with Keri Lawson-Te Aho from 12:30 pm – 1:30pm
  • Preventing Māori suicide: Involving whānau and community 19 February 2013 with Di Grennell and Michael Naera 12:30 – 1:30pm
  • Preventing Māori suicide: Improving care and intervention 19 March 2013 with Dr Nicole Coupe and Dr Lynne Russell. 12:30pm-1:30pm

Webinars are online seminars which allow presenters to interact with an audience live over the internet. Find out more and register for the webinars online.

For further information, contact:

Sophia Graham
Communications Officer
DDI:  09 300 4425 
Mobile:  021 740 454 

About Suicide Prevention Information New Zealand (SPINZ)

Founded in 1999, SPINZ is a non-government, national information service promoting high quality information and resources to promote safe and effective suicide prevention activities.

Part of the Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand, SPINZ is contracted by the Ministry of Health to provide its services, in alignment with the New Zealand Suicide Prevention Strategy and Action Plan.

The SPINZ website has a wealth of resources available to people who are in crisis, as well as those who wish to learn about suicide prevention, or how to respond when someone they know is at risk.

Resource

Mental Health First Aid Guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in India

This study, by Erminia Colucci and colleagues, surveyed suicide prevention experts in India to develop a more culturally relevant set of suicide prevention guidelines:

Background

This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Indian public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal.

Methods

The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of Indian mental health clinicians to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. Experts were recruited by SC, EC and HM. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms.). Responses to the open-ended questions were used to generate new items.

Results

The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 30 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 168 items, 71 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Translated versions of the guidelines will be produced and used for training.

Conclusions

There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to non-mental health professionals working in health and welfare settings.

Similar guidelines have also been published for Japan and the Philippines.